Tag Archives: TEP Projects

Bold Visions for the Embarcadero Emerge at Public Design Workshops

by : sf.streetsblog – excerpt

Ever since the Embarcadero was uncovered from beneath a freeway more than two decades ago, San Franciscans’ appetite for a more people-friendly waterfront only seems to have grown…

At a series of recent public design workshops this month, groups of attendees were asked to put together a display of how they’d re-allocate street space on the Embarcadero. The main idea was to figure out how to provide a protected bikeway, so that riders of all ages can enjoy the popular waterfront without having to mix it up with either motor vehicles or crowds of pedestrians on the shared sidewalk.

At one of the workshops, two groups suggested that half of the roadway, on the waterfront side, be dedicated primarily to walking and biking, even if it includes a shared-space zone where delivery drivers can move through slowly for loading. Finding a design that allows deliveries to safely co-exist with the bikeway seems to have been the main challenge since the SFMTA launched its redesign process in July

There were a handful of attendees who wanted to see little change to the status quo. Rick Hall, who identified himself as a driver, said he sees “a lot of potential for the [design] process to not be fair and open,” and that the project is symbolic of “San Francisco’s war on cars, that I have awakened to.”

Hall said he sees a ”built-in bias” in the design process towards bikes and people, exemplified by the size of the paper traffic lane templates workshop participants used. Participants could place 10-foot-wide traffic lanes on their design board — not wide enough for buses — while the bikeway could be eight to 12 feet, he said.

If you want to keep your lifestyle alive, you better get out and let the SFMTA and your Supervisors know what you want.

The Supervisors to contact about this plan are:
D-3 David.Chiu@sfgov.org
D-6 Jane.Kim@sfgov.org
D-10 Malia.Cohen@sfgov.org

SFMTA project manager: Dan.Provence@sfmta.com.
You can always send your comments to the Mayor: mayoredwinlee@sfgov.org, Ed Reiskin: Ed.reiskin@sfmta.com and the MTA Board members:
MTABoard@sfmta.com

Future Shock : Too much too soon

futureshock

Alvin Toffler introduced us to the concept of Future Shock in a book with that Title in 1970. We are experiencing first hand what the author warned us of when he wrote, “Future shock is the shattering stress and disorientation that we induce in individuals by subjecting them to too much change in too short a time.”

If that doesn’t describe 2014 San Francisco I don’t know what does. We are all reeling from too much too soon. We are being subjected to too much news, too much data, too many bills, too many homeless living on our streets, too many choices, too many social engagements, and too many rules and regulations that are infringing on our lifestyles. We are stressed beyond the breaking point coping with the too much too fast syndrome. The one thing we lack is time.

Too much traffic leads the list of frustrations. We can’t do much about diseases and wars, or the cost of gas or who gets nominated to run for President of the United States, but we can do something about the disaster we are experiencing on our streets.

We can vote No on A and B and Yes on L to send a strong message to city authorities that we have no faith in SFMTA’s current lineup of directors and staff and we are ready to take back control of our streets.

We blame the SFMTA for everything that is wrong with parking, traffic and the public transit system. The SFMTA assumed total control for management of the streets, so they own all the problems and the blame associated with their system. Their failure to serve the public what the public needs and wants is coming to bite them. San Francisco residents do not trust them to make good decisions, or to fix any of the problems they are blamed for creating.

The SFMTA has failed. The change we need is a change in leadership and priorities. SFMTA needs to get us where we need to go, not tell us how to get there.

Demand relief. Vote No on A and B (No more money without accountability) and Yes on L: Restore Transportation Balance.