Market Street

MarketOne major problem is illustrated by the stopped fire truck, caught on Montgomery in gridlocked traffic. It took at least three signal changes to cross Market Street.

The Supervisor to contact about this plan is:
D-6 Jane.Kim@sfgov.org

 

Market Street Red Lanes Complete

The red lanes along Market Street add to the growing list of red transit-only lanes all across San Francisco, including:
  • J Church/ 22 Fillmore: between 16th St and Duboce Ave
  • 8X Bayshore Expresses: 3rd St between Townsend and Jessie Streets
  • 38/38LGeary: Geary between Powell and Polk, O’Farrell between Gough and Powell
  • 71 Haight/Noriega/ 6 Parnassus: Haight Street between Laguna and Market Streets

Many downtown businesses have folded since the downtown traffic alterations have gone into effect. Very few retail is left. Very few restaurants have survived.

2 thoughts on “Market Street”

  1. One often hears how bicycling compliments, but doesn’t harm Muni. Anyone who believes that myth just isn’t paying attention. Ride a bus on Market and observe the interplay between bus and bicycle. The bicyclists tend to come in clusters, sometimes two abreast. Sometimes there’s enough room for them to stay out of the path of the bus, and sometimes not. Sometimes they pedal in straight lines; sometimes they weave a bit. Sometimes, intent on making a left turn, they dart across the path of a bus. It’s clear that the bus drivers are well aware of this new danger. When bicycle lanes are squeezed into tight spaces along Market and other busy Muni streets, the bus drivers understandably slow down. This significantly impedes service. By acquiescing to the incessant clamor of the Bicycle Lobby, a compliant MTA puts obstacles in front of the safe, expeditious and reliable transit service that San Francisco needs and deserves.
    -frequent rider

  2. Reader Comments:

    Here’s one about Market.
    One often hears how bicycling compliments, but doesn’t harm Muni. Anyone who believes that myth just isn’t paying attention. Ride a bus on Market and observe the interplay between bus and bicycle. The bicyclists tend to come in clusters, sometimes two abreast. Sometimes there’s enough room for them to stay out of the path of the bus, and sometimes not. Sometimes they pedal in straight lines; sometimes they weave a bit. Sometimes, intent on making a left turn, they dart across the path of a bus. It’s clear that the bus drivers are well aware of this new danger. When bicycle lanes are squeezed into tight spaces along Market and other busy Muni streets, the bus drivers understandably slow down. This significantly impedes service. By acquiescing to the incessant clamor of the Bicycle Lobby, a compliant MTA puts obstacles in front of the safe, expeditious and reliable transit service that San Francisco needs and deserves.

    – frequent rider

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *